Someone Ate The Candle


Not all contractors. But some contractors.

Those contractors that turn up on a project, full of enthusiasm and utterly unable to understand why those damn data integration folks insist on things like frameworks, coding conventions and change management. Those contractors who cut corners and fudge their data so that they can roll out their project according to whatever arbitrary deadline they have been told to meet.

Inspired by this post on DevOps Reactions, I would like to propose a new term to be used when referring to the results of these contractors efforts: Someone ate the candle.

Someone ate the candle

Someone ate the candle

It would work something like this:

Financial Analyst: All the invoices for the pilot store are doubled. What is going on?
Contractor: …
Data Integration Person1: Looks like someone ate the candle.

I’m not bitter, just very disappointed.

1After four hours of digging through data and loudly wondering why none of this was set up in the test environment.

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Insect Burgers

Yesterday, we took a trip to the zoo. It’s handily close and we were able to go by bike and, after much wondering, we stopped for ice cream. While there, I noticed a large sight in the zoo’s restaurant advertising Insect Burgers as a tasty alternative to meat and fish. This struck me as quite a good idea.

Much has been said about insects being a much more efficient source of protein than raising large animals, but many people react to this with a “Yuck”. Grinding the bugs up and turning them into burgers gets around this quite nicely – a burger is a burger and there isn’t much in a protein patty for most people to object to.

I mentioned this on the Fediverse and that triggered a discussion that was both lengthy and interesting and managed to derail it self into total tripe.

Wanting to know a bit more, I took an online look around this morning and found this (in Dutch).

The Olmense Zoo started serving insect burgers in March of this year and, from the article, it looks like the people behind the burgers were thinking what I thought when I saw them. According to Robby Van der Velden, a biologist at the zoo, insects are high in protein and a lot less fatty than meats such as pork and beef. Although eating insects is not obvious in western society, it can certainly catch on if the meat is processed.

Van der Velden also makes the point about insects requiring much less environmental resources and provides some numbers: To produce a kilo of beef, you need 14 kilos of grass, while a kilo of insect meat only needs about two kilos of grass to produce.

It was too late in the day, yesterday, for me to give this a try. But when we go again, and if we are there at lunchtime (which is highly likely) I will certainly order an insect burger, just to see what it’s like.

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Gnome 3.16: A First Impression

I ran a system update today and Gnome 3.16 turned up. Which was nice.

One thing that I always found mildly annoying in Gnome 3.14 (and I think that this was also true of Gnome 3.12) was that when I clicked the shutdown button it would give me a choice between shutting down or logging out. If I wanted to reboot, I had to log out first and then reboot from the login screen.

So, wondering if anything had been done about the shutdown options, I clicked on the shutdown button.

And my laptop shut itself down.

10/10 for simple behaviour. Minus about 30 for being totally unexpected.

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Moon over Antwerp

Today was the first day of spring, and the day of a partial eclipse. Partial, in this case, being about 90%. It was also very cloudy, which was both fortunate and unfortunate. Unfortunate because the sun – and the eclipse – were often both hidden behind the banks of clouds. On the plus side, however, was the fact that when the clouds did thin a bit, I was able to point my phone at the show.

This, after a bit of tinkering with exposure levels, is what I managed.

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Quote of the Day: Toy Story or Rise of The Machines?

IBM’s Cognitive Computing Engine is, after all, the construct of a 100 year-old non-unionised American corporation. Its world view is bound to differ somewhat from that of a liberal European like myself.

Seamus Quinn on on Elemental Path, who are promising to connect your kids toys to IBM’s Cognitive Computing Engine.

I hadn’t heard of Elemental Path or CogniToys before, but I dop find the idea of giving large corporations such direct access to our kids more than a little disturbing.

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Lawns are Awesome

One of the nicer parts of NewsBlur, my RSS reader of choice, is the Global Shared Stories feature which allows you to take a peek at the stories everyone else is sharing. It’s not something I look at regularly, but I do glance at it every now and then and it was through this that I found this post from Nick Bradbury.

Nick doesn’t like lawns.

Where I live, in the spring you have to start mowing the lawn every week. By summer you have to water it to keep it from dying. Then fall rolls around and you have to rake up the leaves or else they’ll smother the grass. And then you hope it’ll survive the winter.

It feels so pointless constantly taking care of something that shouldn’t be there in the first place. If it was meant to be there it would survive without any help.

Here’s a confession. Last year, for various reasons, we completely failed to mow our lawn at all. It’s still there though.

As far as leaves go, I did sweep the drive and those leaves ended up on the compost. Raking the lawn, not so much. Or at all. It’s still there, though.

From his post, I think that Nick has way too high an expectation of how his lawn should look. For me, a lawn is primarily functional – it’s a place where the kids can jump off trees, invent games, build snowmen and a enjoy an unconstrained play area.

Admittedly, the kids do help me with outdoor work such as cutting wood, building chicken coops and weeding the garden (but not the lawn – never the lawn), but this comes entirely from the kids. They see me doing something and want to be involved, so I find ways to involve them – even if that means the task will take somewhat longer.

Ultimately, with a lawn, with anything, knowing what you want out of it is as essential as recognising how much effort you are willing to put into it. If you want a pristine patch of grass, and are willing to put in the effort to maintain it, that’s fine. Personally, I’m not to worried about that. Admittedly, we did plant a reasonably hardy variety of grass that – so far – has survived the trampling and, if any weeds do manage to survive both being mown and being constantly trodden on, then good luck to them. All that really matters to me is that the surface remains soft enough that the kids will bounce when they fall.

Lawns are awesome, but you need to decide first to have an awesome lawn.

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Duffercast 9: The first Dufferette

Yule Goat Episode 9 of The Duffercast went live today and, unusually for us, we managed to release the sort-of Christmas show sort-of in the right season. Well, our Christmas tree hasn’t been taken down yet.

Two duffers started a discussion. They were later joined by a dufferette and then a third duffer joined in. Why make life simple when we can complicate it.

Go enjoy the dufferdom at Duffercast 9 – The First Dufferette Ever!

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Mister Frosty

It snowed today. And there was still enough snow this afternoon to build a snowman. So Alex built a snowman.

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Exploding Kittens on Kickstarter

This looks awesome

Exploding Kittens is a highly strategic kitty-powered version of Russian Roulette. Players take turns drawing cards until someone draws an exploding kitten and loses the game. The deck is made up of cards that let you avoid exploding by peeking at cards before you draw, forcing your opponent to draw multiple cards, or shuffling the deck.

The game gets more and more intense with each card you draw because fewer cards left in the deck means a greater chance of drawing the kitten and exploding in a fiery ball of feline hyperbole.

The game is the creation of Matthew Inman of The Oatmeal and a couple of game designers (Elan Lee amd Shane Small). Not entirely surprisingly, the Kickstarter campaign reached its funding goal in 20 minutes. I backed it anyway because: Exploding Kittens.

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