Duffercast 12: Don’t Ask

Good things come to those that wait. Also, episode 12 of the Duffercast has now been released.

Four gentlemen golfers on the tee of a golf course As a Swedish proverb says: The wait for something good can never be too long. The duffers are finally back with an episode that was not only recorded, but also published. We sincerely hope the shock is not too great. And if it is, we hope it is pleasant.

Click here to find the full shownotes and to download the episode to your audio device of choice.

In related news, the Duffercast is now part of the Otherside Podcast Network, a community of podcasts from a variety of genres that tend to veer away from the more usual mainstream fare. Shows on the network include – but are not limited to – music, technology and discussions. So take a look, and then start updating your podcatcher.

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Panorama freedom update

atomium Back in August, I mentioned that a couple of Liberal MPs in Belgium were seeking to implement “panorama rights” in the country. These would ensure that copyright claims could not made for works placed in public.

In short, if an artist puts a work in a public space, they have already conceded that people can take photos of it.

And now:

The Belgian parliament’s business commission has just finalised proposals for legislation on ‘panorama freedom’ and this will mean that everyone gets the right to take photographs of such landmarks without having to fear the full force of the law.

Flemish liberal lawmakers Patricia Ceysens and Frank Wilryck argue that the individual’s right to take snaps should prevail above copyright that offers protection to works of art and buildings in the public domain: “This is simple logic, especially because many of these works of art have been purchased using monies from the public purse.”

Under the bill that has the backing of other government parties everybody will have the right to take snaps of and share images of such landmarks as well publish photographs in books and on the internet. The works must be on permanent display in the public domain. Works of art in museums will still be protected.

With luck, I will be able to legally take a photo of the Atomium before I die.

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The future of food

It's not a bug, it's a feature.
It’s not a bug, it’s a feature.
Last year I mentioned that the Olmense Zoo (which is handily close to us) now has insectburgers on the menu. And on Saturday we were in the zoo at lunchtime, so I gave one a try.

It’s really rather good.

The texture is very meaty. So much so that, if it wasn’t for all the signs promoting the fact that the burger is made of mealworms, I probably wouldn’t have realised there was anything out of the ordinary about it at all.

The taste of the burger is not particularly strong, and pretty much overwhelmed by the barbecue sauce that was included with the burger. It’s certainly not unpleasant, it’s just not much of anything.

Of course, the crucial question with something like this is: would I eat it again. The answer is a resounding yes.

Insects are high in protein and a lot less fatty than beef and pork, they can also provide an equivalent protein yield for far fewer resources. The only downside is cultural – we, in the west are not used to eating insects and tend to have a ‘yuck’ response when faced with the idea. Serving them as a burger gets around this very neatly indeed.

Now all the world needs is a for someone to invent the chili con mealworm.

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Setting up a Multiplayer Voxelands Server on Debian

I mentioned an intention of setting up a Voxelands server a month ago so that Macsen and I could play in the same environment, and I have now finally gotten around to doing this. The server itself is running Debian 8 and the process turned out to be surprisingly painless.

I installed the Ubuntu deb from the Voxelands download page using gdebi, because I need my dependency resolution:

wget http://www.voxelands.com/downloads/voxelands-1602.00-ubuntu-x86_64.deb
gdebi voxelands-1602.00-ubuntu-x86_64.deb

And starting the server is a simple case of typing:

voxelands-server --port 30000

And, if I was going to run this only once, this would be enough. But as I want this to be available as and when required, it’s time for Systemd.

Handily, the Voxelands site provides a sample Systemd.service, so I copied and pasted it into /lib/systemd/system/voxelands.service with just one change:

ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/voxelands-server --port 30000

Then it’s just a case of enabling it:
systemctl enable voxelands

And starting it:
systemctl start voxelands

Now all I need to do is to upgrade the client versions so that they match the server.

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Voxels ate my weekend

Sunrise
Sunrise

Last week Macsen expressed an interest in Minecraft. He has access to an old laptop of mine, so I spent an evening upgrading it from OpenSuse to Antergos and installing Voxelands1 on it, along with a number of other games. I also installed Voxelands on my own laptop so that I could understand the interface well enough to answer any questions that might crop up.

I didn’t intend to start playing the damn game.

I did, however, spend a bit of time poking around the wiki so that, on Friday, I was able to show Macsen how to make a crafting guide and set him going. And he was off, digging, crafting and building. So much so that we had to crowbar him away from the laptop when it was time to eat2.

On Saturday Macsen asked me how my house was going. So I opened up my laptop and showed him what I’d built while tinkering around. Macsen showed me how to build a furnace and went away to copy my house design.

The rest of the weekend was a bit of a blur of YouTubery, sharing of ideas (something in which the twins were able to become involved), digging, crafting and building. And I have to say that there is something quite magical about an eight-year-old enthusiastically describing what he’s discovered and planning his next project.

At present we are both playing in single player mode. We have talked about shared worlds and I am thinking of setting up a small local3 server, but that is a task for another weekend.

I’m not normally much of a gamer but Voxelands has me hooked. It’s immersive, expansive, endlessly entertaining and frighteningly addictive. Darkrose and the rest of the Voxelands team have done a fantastic job so far. Long may they continue.

Footnotes

1 Voxelands is a fork of Minetest which is an Open Source implementation of Minecraft. From my limited reading, my understanding is that the Minetest developers have emphasised their modding engine at the expense of playability. Voxelands has dropped the modding engine and seeks, instead, to deliver a game that is complete, playable and fun. And playable is what I was looking for.
2 Figuratively speaking, of course. But now I’m wondering if it’s possible to craft a crowbar.
3 As in local to my home network and not connected to the interwebs.

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Bad Facebook. No Cookie.

Facebook’s ongoing attempt to get around EU privacy legislation in Belgium has taken a turn for the semantic:

Facebook has appealed a ruling from the Court of First Instance that supported the Belgian data authority’s demand that the social media network stop tracking users.

The court’s ruling contained some English words — like cookie, homepage and browser — which could violate a Belgian law that says all rulings must be in the official languages of the country: French, Dutch and German. Facebook has said this means the whole ruling must be annulled.

Facebook’s lawyers need to get out more. They’re not fooling anyone with this.

Privacy lawyers not associated with the case told POLITICO this is a “desperate, petty and last-ditch” attempt to avoid Belgian justice.

And that’s putting it mildly.

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